Christmas Tree Farm, Fresh Cut Christmas Tree, Reindeer Rental http://mychristmastreefarm.com Wed, 22 Dec 2010 17:24:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 Few, Fun Christmas Tree Facts http://mychristmastreefarm.com/2010/12/few-fun-christmas-tree-facts/ http://mychristmastreefarm.com/2010/12/few-fun-christmas-tree-facts/#comments Wed, 22 Dec 2010 16:49:51 +0000 http://mychristmastreefarm.com/?p=283 Just thought we would share a few, fun Christmas tree facts with you.  And just maybe these Christmas tree facts will help you win that holiday trivia game. Evergreen trees are not really EVER green. The needles of coniferous trees don't stay on forever. As the needles become older, they drop off the tree to […]

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Just thought we would share a few, fun Christmas tree facts with you.  And just maybe these Christmas tree facts will help you win that holiday trivia game.

  • Evergreen trees are not really EVER green. The needles of coniferous trees don't stay on forever. As the needles become older, they drop off the tree to make room for new needles!
  • Today, 98% (98 of every 100) of the trees grown for the holidays are grown on farms.
  • The Christmas tree for the White House has to be exactly 18 1/2 feet tall and look great with the decorations chosen by the First Lady.
  • In October or November, the Head Usher of the White House visits the farm of the National Christmas Tree Association's Grand Champion grower for the year to select the perfect tree. Holiday trees were once used by Chimney Sweeps to clean the soot out of dirty chimneys!
  • Real Conifer needles need just the right amount of sunlight for the tree to produce food. The triangle shape of the tree is an adaptation that allows more needles to "see" the sun.
  • As a tree grows older and taller, less sunlight reaches the needles on the lower part of the tree. When this happens, the lower areas shed their needles – and eventually – their branches.
  • Trees help filter dust and smog from the air AND they help stop erosion by holding soil in place!
  • Moose, Whitetail deer, chickadees, squirrels, nutcrackers, and porcupines all use the Balsam fir (its needles or seeds) for food.

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A Few, Fun Christmas Tree Facts http://mychristmastreefarm.com/2010/11/a-few-fun-christmas-tree-facts/ http://mychristmastreefarm.com/2010/11/a-few-fun-christmas-tree-facts/#comments Tue, 23 Nov 2010 18:03:28 +0000 http://mychristmastreefarm.com/?p=278

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Fresh Cut Wreath Coupon http://mychristmastreefarm.com/2010/10/fresh-cut-wreath-coupon/ Thu, 07 Oct 2010 14:55:25 +0000 http://mychristmastreefarm.com/?p=248 Printable Coupon

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Printable Coupon

fresh cut wreath

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Reindeer Dust Food http://mychristmastreefarm.com/2010/10/reindeer-dust-food/ Tue, 05 Oct 2010 14:00:51 +0000 http://mychristmastreefarm.com/?p=222 When sprinkled outside, this reindeer food is said to sparkle in the moonlight, attracting the reindeer and Santa's sleigh to your house! •    ½ cup rolled oats •    2 tablespoons glitter or decorating sugar Mix together and sprinkle outside on Christmas Eve, before you go to sleep. This recipe is best for sparkle; however, if […]

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When sprinkled outside, this reindeer food is said to sparkle in the moonlight, attracting the reindeer and Santa's sleigh to your house!


•    ½ cup rolled oats
•    2 tablespoons glitter or decorating sugar


Mix together and sprinkle outside on Christmas Eve, before you go to sleep. This recipe is best for sparkle; however, if you have lots of birds and other wildlife in your area, you may want to try substituting holiday-colored decorating sugars for the glitter, as glitter can be harmful to your neighborhood birds if they eat it.

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Christmas Cookie Recipes http://mychristmastreefarm.com/2010/08/christmas-cookie-recipes/ Tue, 03 Aug 2010 02:20:01 +0000 http://mychristmastreefarm.com/?p=211 Reindeer Cookies by Tami Rose These cute little cookies are sure to be a big hit with the kids this year. Don’t forget to leave Santa some with a big glass of milk! This fun Christmas recipe for kids is easy to make and super fun to eat. Give some as gifts, great for teachers! […]

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Reindeer Cookies
by Tami Rose

These cute little cookies are sure to be a big hit with the kids this year. Don’t forget to leave Santa some with a big glass of milk! This fun Christmas recipe for kids is easy to make and super fun to eat. Give some as gifts, great for teachers!

What You Need

1 roll of pre-made sugar cookie dough
small pretzel rings
M & Ms
1 bell shaped cookie cutter
flour
baking sheet

What You Do

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Open cookie dough and mix in about 1/4 cup of flour to make the dough a stiffer consistency. Lightly flour the table, then roll the dough out to 1/4 inch thickness.

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Fake Christmas Tree Facts http://mychristmastreefarm.com/2009/11/fake-christmas-tree-facts/ Mon, 09 Nov 2009 19:48:15 +0000 http://mychristmastreefarm.com/?p=64 What You Might Not Know About Fake Christmas Trees * Where do they come from? Most fake trees (85%) in the U.S. are imported from China. Almost 10 Million fake trees were sold worldwide in 2003. The U.S. Commerce Dept. tracks the Import of Fake Trees Most fake trees are made of metals and plastic. […]

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What You Might Not Know About Fake Christmas Trees

* Where do they come from?

Most fake trees (85%) in the U.S. are imported from China. Almost 10 Million fake trees were sold worldwide in 2003. The U.S. Commerce Dept. tracks the Import of Fake Trees
Most fake trees are made of metals and plastic. * What are the factories like where they’re made?

As noted in the Washington Post, “On the concrete floors of Zhang’s Shuitou Company factory, migrant workers, most earning about $100 a month, squat in front of hissing machinery as they melt chips into moildable plastic…”

Read the full article.

* What are fake trees made of?

Most artificial Christmas trees are made of metals and plastics. The plastic material, typically PVC, can be a potential source of hazardous lead. Read a warning about them from the Children’s Health Environmental Coalition.
Lead can sometimes be found in artificial trees. * Why do some artificial trees carry a warning label?

The potential for lead poisoning is great enough that fake trees made in China are required by California Prop 65 to have a warning label.

Read more about the effects of lead poisoning.

Learn more about lead in artificial trees.

View a 2007 report from CNN on the dangers of lead in holiday decorations, such as fake trees and wreaths:

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Caring for your Balled and Burlaped Tree http://mychristmastreefarm.com/2009/11/caring-for-your-balled-and-burlaped-tree/ Mon, 09 Nov 2009 19:45:20 +0000 http://mychristmastreefarm.com/?p=62 If you get a tree with roots attached, either in a pot or burlap, please read these suggestions: • The adaptability of the species should be considered. Many species are shipped outside of their natural area and may not be adaptable to other areas. Check with a reliable nursery or extension forester. • Keep in […]

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If you get a tree with roots attached, either in a pot or burlap, please read these suggestions:

• The adaptability of the species should be considered. Many species are shipped outside of their natural area and may not be adaptable to other areas. Check with a reliable nursery or extension forester.
• Keep in mind that Living Trees are VERY heavy and bulky. A six foot tall balled and burlapped tree will weigh as much as 250 pounds.
• The tree should be stored in an unheated, sheltered area such as a garage or porch, out of the wind and sun. Do not expose the tree to freezing temperatures at any time.
• The tree will need adequate water. The root ball or soil should be kept slightly damp but not flooded. Wrap the root ball of a balled tree in plastic or place in a tub while it is in the house.
• Live trees may be decorated, but with care. If lights are used, they must not give off any heat.
• Do not remove the tree directly from a warm house out into freezing temperatures. Instead, move to a sheltered area first for several days.
• If the ground is unfrozen, the tree may be replanted. The spot to be dug should be mulched to prevent freezing. Plant as soon as possible.
• Do not remove the burlap and strapping (unless it is plastic). This keeps the root ball solid and secure. In the instance of a plastic cover, cut the cord and roll down the plastic at least half way prior to planting. Tap the tree container of a potted tree and remove prior to planting. Do not attempt to remove soil from the root system. Earth removed from the original hole should be backfilled around the root ball. Mulch heavily over the top of the planted root ball to prevent it from freezing. Water only as needed: a flooded tree may not survive.
• Stake the trees to prevent wind tipping or damage during the first growing season.

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Christmas Tree Facts http://mychristmastreefarm.com/2009/11/christmas-tree-facts/ Mon, 09 Nov 2009 19:36:40 +0000 http://mychristmastreefarm.com/?p=60 * There are approximately 25-30 million Real Christmas Trees sold in the U.S. every year. * There are close to 350 million Real Christmas Trees currently growing on Christmas Tree farms in the U.S. alone, all planted by farmers. Real Christmas Trees are grown on farms * North American Real Christmas Trees are grown in […]

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* There are approximately 25-30 million Real Christmas Trees sold in the U.S. every year.
* There are close to 350 million Real Christmas Trees currently growing on Christmas Tree farms in the U.S. alone, all planted by farmers. Real Christmas Trees are grown on farms
* North American Real Christmas Trees are grown in all 50 states and Canada. Eighty percent (80%) of artificial trees worldwide are manufactured in China, according to the U.S. Commerce Department.
* Real Trees are a renewable, recyclable resource. Artificial trees contain non-biodegradable plastics and possible metal toxins such as lead.
* There are more than 4,000 local Christmas Tree recycling programs throughout the United States.
* For every Real Christmas Tree harvested, 1 to 3 seedlings are planted the following spring.
* There are about 350,000 acres in production for growing Christmas Trees in the U.S.; much of it preserving green space.
* There are close to 15,000 farms growing Christmas Trees in the U.S., and over 100,000 people are employed full or part-time in the industry.
* It can take as many as 15 years to grow a tree of typical height (6 – 7 feet) or as little as 4 years, but the average growing time is 7 years.
* The top Christmas Tree producing states are Oregon, North Carolina, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Washington. (See a complete list of all 50 states ranked by several variables.)
* The most common Christmas Tree species are: balsam fir, Douglas-fir, Fraser fir, noble fir, Scotch pine, Virginia pine and white pine.

USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, National Christmas Tree Association (NCTA) and your local Christmas Tree professional.

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How To Care for Your Farm-Grown Fresh Christmas Tree http://mychristmastreefarm.com/2009/11/how-to-care-for-your-farm-grown-fresh-christmas-tree/ Mon, 09 Nov 2009 19:26:45 +0000 http://mychristmastreefarm.com/?p=58 When a Christmas tree is cut, typically over half of its weight is water. With proper care, you can maintain the quality of your displayed trees. Below are a number of tips relating to the care of displayed trees: 1. Displaying trees in water in a traditional reservoir type stand is the most effective way […]

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When a Christmas tree is cut, typically over half of its weight is water. With proper care, you
can maintain the quality of your displayed trees. Below are a number of tips relating to the care
of displayed trees:
1. Displaying trees in water in a traditional reservoir type stand is the most effective way of
maintaining their freshness and minimizing needle loss problems.
2. Make a fresh cut to remove a ¼” to 1” thick disk of wood from the base of the trunk before
putting the tree in the stand. Make the cut perpendicular to the stem axis.
3. Don’t cut the trunk at an angle, or into a v-shape, which makes it far more difficult to hold
the tree in the stand and also reduces the amount of water available to the tree.
4. Once home, place the tree in water as soon as possible. Most species can go 6-8 hours after
cutting the trunk and still take up water. Don’t bruise the cut surface or get it dirty.
5. If needed, trees can be temporarily stored for several days in a cool location. Place the
freshly cut trunk in a bucket that is kept full of water.
6. To display the trees indoors, use a stand with an adequate water holding capacity for the
tree. As a general rule, stands should provide 1 quart of water per inch of stem diameter.
Devices are available that help maintain a constant water level in the stand.
7. Use a stand that fits your tree. Avoid whittling the sides of the trunk down to fit a stand.
The outer layers of wood are the most efficient in taking up water and should not be removed.
8. Keep displayed trees away from sources of heat (fireplaces, heaters, heat vents, direct
sunlight). Lowering the room temperature will slow the drying process, resulting in less water
consumption each day.
9. The temperature of the water used to fill the stand is not important and does not affect water
uptake.
10. Check the stand daily to make sure that the level of water does not go below the base of the
tree. With many stands, there can still be water in the stand even though the base of
the tree is no longer submerged in water.
11. Drilling a hole in the base of the trunk does not improve water uptake.
12. Use of lights that produce low heat, such as miniature lights, will reduce drying of the tree.
13. Always inspect light sets prior to placing them on the tree. If worn, replace with a new set.
14. Do not overload electrical circuits.
15. Always turn off the lights when leaving the house or when going to bed.
16. Monitor the tree for freshness. After Christmas or if the tree is dry, remove it from the
house.
17. Go to www.realchristmastrees.org and type in your zip code to find a recycling program
near you.
18. Never burn any part of a Christmas tree in a wood stove or fireplace.
Prepared by Dr. Gary Chastagner and Dr. Eric Hinesley
Edited by the Scientific Research Committee of the National Christmas Tree Association

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